Dawson Precision Glock Magazine Extension [2020]

Dawson Precision Glock Magazine Extension

Dawson Precision is one of the biggest names in shooting sports. Their basepads and magazine extensions are consistently among the most common in USPSA. With a stellar track record, I needed to try them for myself.

Mounting Dawson Precision Magazine Extensions

Mounting is extremely simple. Remove your factory base pad and spring then transfer your follower onto the Dawson magazine spring. This longer spring will help insure reliability with your extension. Insert the spring and follower into the magazine body, then you are ready to attach the new base pad.

Simply slide the locking plate off the base pad, slide the extension onto your magazine, then slide the locking plate back on. No tools are necessary! Despite this simplicity, the extensions are very secure, firmly locking into place. There is a raised and textured portion of the locking plate to give a solid purchase when adding/removing the extension.

Dimensions

Dawson Precision magazine extensions are comparable in size to the competition. Slightly shorter and fatter than offerings from Taran Tactical and others. The top edges of the extension feature beveling at a downward angle to improve compatibility with flared magwells. Weight comes in at 4.6 ounces attached, making them one of the heavier options on the market. The additional weight helps magazines drop free at more extreme angles. While the extensions are not heavy to tire the shooter, the Dawson extensions are noticeably heavier than others.

Dawson Precision Glock Magazine Extension

Designed specifically for use in competition, this extension meets the 140mm requirement for use in USPSA. These will add six rounds of 9mm, and five rounds of .40S&W to your magazines.

Aside from the small raised area on the locking plate, these extensions are totally smooth. Edges are dehorned, so there are no sharp or rough portions to cause discomfort. Even when shooting in rain I've never had trouble getting a solid grip on these extensions.

Function

Before being trusted on my belt all magazine extensions endure a drop test. Parameters are simple. Each magazine is fully loaded, then dropped five times onto concrete from shoulder height. Mags are dropped straight down onto the extension as though falling from a firing pistol. After five consecutive drops, my Dawson Precision extension came away victorious. There were a few dings along the edges but nothing to cause concern.

Dawson Precision Glock Magazine Extension

The Dawson extension became one of my primary magazines throughout 2019 and into 2020. In addition to regular practice, it saw action in USPSA, Shooter Symposium, the Rangemaster Handgun Instructor course, and Citizen's Defense Research Handgun Tests & Standards. While I don't have an exact round count, I'd estimate roughly 1,000 rounds were cycled through this extension.

Range time continues to be equally impressive as the drop test results. Magazines have been rained on; dropped in dirt, sand and mud; slammed into concrete, and have never once been cleaned. As of this writing, I am yet to see a stoppage or malfunction while using the Dawson Precision magazine extension. The only thing of note is a few millimeters of movement in the locking plate about halfway through the review process. After pressing the plate flush again I have never seen additional movement.

Final Thoughts on the Dawson Precision Magazine Extension

Overall, the Dawson Precision magazine extensions are fantastic. Machining is excellent, reliability--so far--is flawless. Mounting is simple, tool-less, and easy to perform. While I only own one, I'd be happy to have a belt full of these extensions.

MSRP on the Dawson Precision magazine extensions is $32.49, with an included extra power spring. Shooters have the choice between silver or black finish for the same price. You can find complete kits from Brownells >>HERE<<

About Daniel Reedy 159 Articles
Daniel is a Range Master and NRA certified handgun and rifle instructor and range safety officer, as well as a USPSA pistol and Multi-Gun competitor. He has received training from Craig Douglas, Mike Pannone, and Scott Jedlinski among others. In his free time Daniel enjoys petting puppies and reading the Constitution. Daniel also writes for the Kommando Blog

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